Archive for the ‘Independent’ Category

Bret Boone begins Indie coaching career.

The Seattle Times is reporting that former Mariners star Bret Boone is taking a managerial job with the Victoria Seals of the Golden League. The team is located in British Columbia, so the 40-year-old Boone may be in a perfect position to draw fans in the Pacific NW to indie baseball this summer.

“This is a fantastic opportunity for me to start the second chapter of my baseball career,” said Boone, 40. “Returning to the Pacific Northwest is a thrill for me.”

Boone’s position with the Seals marks his first foray into professional baseball management.

The Seals open their season May 21. The Golden Baseball League is an independent league featuring nine teams, from Calgary to Tucson.

[Seattle Times]

Is it just me, or is Boone looking a bit Cal Ripkenesque in this particular photo?

Bus Leagues Q&A: Tiffany Brooks of the Arizona Winter League

A few days ago, I reported a tidbit of news about Japanese baseball star Eri Yoshida, who will be joining the Yuma Scorpions for the Arizona Winter League season. Turns out she’s not going to be the only woman joining the pros in the Golden League this winter. Former Gonzaga softball player Tiffany Brooks let me know that she’ll be there as well. I was pleased when she agreed to be interviewed for Bus Leagues, and I hope those of you who get a chance will head out to see some Arizona Winter League action and cheer Tiffany and her teammates on.

Here’s our conversation, which was conducted via coast-to-coast email as I was digging out from the east coast’s Snowpocalypse ’09. We talked about why she wants to play baseball instead of softball, what she hopes to accomplish in her first crack at professional baseball in the U.S., and how young girls can realize their athletic dreams.

Bus Leagues: How did you connect with the Arizona Winter League? 

Tiffany Brooks: I was looking for tryout opportunities for pro baseball, and because there is an ancient (1952) and silly ban on women in the MLB, that meant I needed to focus solely on Independent Professional Baseball for now and originally started exploring the Continental League because of its expansion. I explored a few options, and was excited to get a call from the Joliet Jackhammers (Northern League), but there was no follow-up, so I started exploring other options where I could showcase and see what might happen. The Arizona Winter League (Golden Baseball League) is the best-established and best-attended by scouts, so I contacted Stephen Bedford and asked if women were welcome. He contacted the Commissioner, Kevin Outcalt, and although they both said it had never been done before, I got back an immediate and warm invitation. The Commissioner, by the way, has been amazing and supportive of my participation in the AWL.

What are your goals for the winter session?

Well, as you might imagine, like any ballplayer, my dream is to win a contract with someone. I’d love to play in the GBL because I live in the West, but would be happy to go literally anywhere to play. I’ve played in Holland in the amateur portion of the Dutch League and speak Spanish and a little Japanese, so who knows?

Beyond my personal goal to win a professional contract and fulfill a lifelong dream of playing pro ball, I do have some other large-scale goals. I’d say number one would be to play well, help my team and play the game the way it is meant to be played – to show that women who have a talent and love for the game and are willing to live, eat, sleep, and sweat baseball, if given the proper training and opportunities, CAN play baseball with the men at the professional level. In this way, I sincerely hope to help pave the way for women’s participation in pro baseball here in America, and throughout the world.

Lastly, I hope to hone my own skills through professional-level instruction, and through the process of raising the level of my game, learn instructional techniques I can bring back and share with women and girls who want to play baseball!

Do you meet many other women who want to play baseball instead of softball?

World-wide, baseball is much more popular with women than softball is, so yes, in my travels playing ball, I meet women who want to play baseball all the time! Here in the US, I’m meeting an increasing number who suddenly realize that playing Baseball is an option – that they don’t have to play softball unless they want to. They’re both great games, and I did play abroad on pro contracts in softball before realizing that my lifelong dreams of playing pro baseball might have a chance to come true!

In the US and Canada there are many, many women playing baseball right now – some in women’s-only tournaments, some playing in men’s amateur leagues, and some in both – who have realized their dream to keep playing baseball. Now it’s time for the next step – to integrate women into professional baseball, and give them the pathways to develop the skills necessary to get there.

You plan to room with Eri Yoshida in the AWL. Have you spoken to her yet, or will you meet for the first time when you get to Yuma?

I heard the initial plan is for us to room together. I haven’t spoken with Eri, so we’ll meet for the first time there. We should make for some interesting photo opps, as she’s 5′ and I’m a 6 footer with quite a lot of muscle. Eri is quite well known in Japan and has created quite a media buzz, so I’m not sure if rooming together is a done deal or whether we both may need some space for media and quiet time. Regardless, I look forward to meeting her, working together to help promote women’s baseball, and hopefully for some great cultural exchanges.

Why do you think softball became the more common sport for women to play?

That’s a complicated question, and not without some political implications.

Softball was originally invented to be played indoors for factory workers (mostly all men) to have something to do during the winter months in places like Chicago. Many were baseball players at various levels in good weather and wanted to keep playing something with a stick and a ball when it was too cold or snowy outside. In those days, the ball actually was “soft,” so that shorter distances could be used indoors without damaging walls, factory equipment, and yes, players. Nowdays the ball of course is anything but soft…equally as hard (if not more so) than a baseball.

How did it become a “women’s” sport (don’t tell that to the US Men’s National Fastpitch team, by the way!)? According to the synopsis of Jennifer Ring’s book Stolen Bases: Why American Girls Don’t Play Baseball, “In the early twentieth century, Albert Goodwill Spalding–sporting goods magnate, baseball player, and promoter–declared baseball off limits for women and envisioned global baseball on a colonialist scale, using the American sport to teach men from non-white races and non-European cultures to become civilized and rational. And by the late twentieth century, baseball had become serious business for boys and men at all levels, with female players perceived as obstacles or detriments to rising male players’ chances of success.” If this is truly the case (along with Commissioner Ford Frick‘s ban of women in professional baseball in 1952), then it becomes fairly clear that pathways to pro baseball were no longer open, and many women who loved to play baseball got channeled into the “other” sport with a stick and a ball. Since then, of course, women have taken softball to the Olympics and into their own pro league, competing as highly-skilled athletes.

I think the harder answer to this question is that although all women CAN play baseball, just like men, not all of us have the genetic, physical attributes to play at the pro level, and given the lack of opportunities for women to advance their baseball playing abilities (it’s still a huge fight to play baseball in High School, College, or American Legion/Travel Ball), it’s rare to find a woman with not only a passion for the game, but the physical attributes and training necessary to play alongside men in professional ball. Hopefully that will change soon, as opportunities expand and girls and women are once again given the chance to dream about playing in the Big Leagues.

How did you first fall in love with baseball?

That’s almost like asking a fish how it first came to swim! I fell in love with baseball from the first moment I laid hands on a ball and glove. I started playing at age 4 in tee-ball and have played baseball or softball ever since. I was forced out of baseball at age 15, but returned to it after a career in Softball. There is something magical about every single time you step on the field. I think it’s a form of religion, a type of religious ritual. Those stadiums we get to play in sometimes are Cathedrals. They are our Notre Dames. High School fields are chapels…but sacred nonetheless. They are like holy places to me – and to most other ballplayers I’ve talked with…well, they feel the same.

Was it easy to find a game when you were a kid?

I grew up dirt poor, so I played wherever and whenever I could. We always found a way to play – pick-up games, in the street, whatever. I grew up rurally, so when there was no one around, stop signs and trees became catchers, tree limbs became bats, and there wasn’t a rock or dirt clod in sight that was safe. I would also sit for hours at a time and throw a tennis ball at a concrete wall.

As for playing on boys’ teams, I was very well accepted until about age 13. Then although I was still bigger than a lot of the boys, things started to change. My teammates respected my playing from age 13-15 when I played, pitched and hit well, but other teams began to put the pressure on my own teammates. Eventually, the pressure built and I was forced into Softball. Nevertheless, I was an all-star from age 8-15 at 1B and as a reliever.

You played in college. Are you worried that the current financial crunch in higher education might kill off some opportunities for women to play softball/baseball?

Great question. Yeah, the current financial situation is tough on schools, especially with sports programs. I think it could be a two-edged sword. On the one hand, the NCAA has recently ruled that baseball and softball are NOT equivalent sports, so no longer can women be funneled into Softball if they want to play Baseball. The ruling and the reality are two different matters of course, but it’s a big step in the right direction.

So, if a school were to eliminate softball, then the girls could possibly swell the ranks of baseball. On the other hand, if baseball and softball are both eliminated due to financial problems, then of course, ALL ballplayers are hurt. One side effect I’ve seen is that travel ball seems to be growing as the school programs are suffering financially. This may be good for girls who want to play baseball, but it’s too early for me to tell what will happen. I hope for the positive for all – for girls who want to play Softball to keep having the opportunity, and for girls who want to play Baseball, for them to have an open door to prove themselves and keep playing the game they love.

You’ve traveled quite a bit as a player. Where are some of the most exciting places you’ve gone around the world?

I’ve had the tremendous opportunity to play in many places, and that’s been made possible by all my coaches who gave of themselves selflessly over the years, by my present sponsors, Akadema, The 90 MPH Club, 3n2Sports, Gold’s Gym, Birch Bats, and Dr. Pirie at the Spokane Eye Clinic. I couldn’t do it without their support and the support of all my friends and family who have been patrons, patronesses, and just plain great.

I’d say I’ve loved to play everywhere I’ve had the opportunity. For baseball, playing in Hong Kong, China has probably been the most exciting…playing with women from all over the world and competing for the gold twice there has been one of the greatest experiences of my life. Playing baseball in Holland, a the only female ballplayer in the league was amazing… my coach there, Quansio Quant, my catcher, and all the guys were tremendously supportive.

In softball, I’d say playing in Australia and the Czech Republic…both were pretty exotic places to get to play, and although the Aussies might not think it’s exotic, watching a dozen wallabies hop off the practice field and being run off the field by an Aussie Brown (deadly) snake seem pretty exotic to me!

Do you have a signature pitch you hope to impress with this winter, or do you expect to see more time in the field?

I’d say we’ll have to wait and see. This will be a good test for me. I’ve played at the amateur level with guys about as far as I can go, and with women, about the same at international competition.

I have six pitches I throw, and I’m hoping at least a couple will give the guys some trouble. I’ve been hitting well at the amateur levels (wood bat), but again, this is quite a leap in level. I’m pretty sure I can compete defensively with my glove at 1B, but we’ll have to see where my strengths lie. The main thing is whether it is with my arm as a relief pitcher or with my glove and bat, I want to help my team and do honor to the game by playing it the best I possibly can.

What would you say to young girls out there who love baseball but have limited opportunities to participate on a team level?

I’d say do not give up! If this is the game you want to play, don’t take “no” for an answer. You’ll need to have thick skin on some of the teams, even at the teenage and adult levels. Shake off the negativity like a duck shakes off water. Practice your game. Train. Get strong… get just as strong as the guys. Don’t be worried about image…if you love the game, do whatever it takes to be successful. Practice at least 6 days a week, and think about the game every day. Believe in yourself and be the best player on the field. Play Hard and Dream Big!

ESPN’s E:60 to Feature a Bus Leaguer

faiola_thumbnail_largeGenerally speaking, I’m not a big fan of having my heart warmed. That usually means someone is going to toy with my emotions somehow. But I’ll make an exception for Josh Faiola, the Frontier League player who stayed in an old folks’ home this season.

ESPN will tell Faiola’s story on October 27 at 7pm, and they were kind enough to provide us with this dandy sneak preview:

“Assisted Living” Excerpt

I guess the Annie Savoy situation is just a fantasy.

2009 Bus Leagues Independent Awards

Andrew approached me last week with a complaint: in compiling the list of nominees for the Bus Leagues Player of the Year award, I had neglected to include representatives from any of the independent leagues.

You could argue that this was an inexcusable offense for someone with my background; I prefer to imagine that it was my way of protesting the likely death of independent baseball in Nashua (note: it was the first reason).

In the end I figured it was worth it to go through each of the independent leagues that played in 2009 and try to find some of the top performers.  And was I ever glad that I did, because there were some crazy numbers posted around the independents this year.

(A note on the selection process: rather than pester the guys who voted for the affiliated Player and Pitcher of the Year awards, I decided to just make this call on my own, with some input from Andrew.  It just figured to be easier that way.  I also added a Reliever of the Year award as a nod to those who didn’t like the fact that all pitchers were combined for the affiliated award.)

Independent Player of the Year
Joey Metropoulos, Southern Illinois Miners (Frontier League)

joey metropoulosCutting the list of offensive players down to about ten names was easy.  Getting it to six was tough, but doable.  Picking a winner was damn near impossible.  Finally, in a fit of “I just don’t know what to do,” I decided to take drastic measures, reading each player’s name to my wife and grading based on her reaction.  The first few were lukewarm: “eh”, “maybe”, and one flat-out “no”.  Then I got to Joey Metropoulos, who was greeted with such an enthusiastic “YES!” that I was, quite frankly, a little concerned.

So Metropoulos had the benefit of having a great name, one that is strong and lends itself well to a variety of nicknames (the one I’m using right now is “Captain Metropoulos”).  That got things off to a good start.  As luck would have it, he also had a tremendous offensive season, hitting .317 with 31 homeruns, 82 RBI and a 1.061 (.651 SLG/.410 OBP) OPS.  Just for kicks, I figured out what his numbers would have been over the course of a 162 game season (he actually played in 96 games) – how does 52 homeruns and 138 RBI sound?

For Metropoulos’ troubles, he won the Frontier League’s Most Valuable Player award and earned a spot on Baseball America’s postseason All-Independent Leagues First Team.

Honorable Mention
Ernie Banks, River City Rascals (Frontier League): 24 HR, 75 RBI, .353/.668/.437
Nelson Castro, Calgary Vipers (Golden Baseball League): 11 HR, 81 RBI, 33 SB, .410/.647/.460
Jason James, Rockford Riverhawks (Frontier League): 14 HR, 48 RBI, .374/.571/.455, 40-game hitting streak
Charlton Jimerson, Newark Bears (Atlantic League): 21 HR, 62 RBI, 38 SB, .335/.567/.387
Greg Porter, Wichita Wingnuts (American Association): 21 HR, 86 RBI, .372/.617/.453

Independent Pitcher of the Year
Kyle Wright, Rockford Riverhawks (Frontier League)

kyle wrightKyle Wright was, after much deliberation, my first choice for Independent Pitcher of the Year.  Then new information came to light and I decided that he didn’t deserve the award.  Then I thought about it some more and realized that even though my original information was bad, Wright was still pretty good.  So he wins.

From the glazed look on the collected face of our readers, I gather that further explanation is required.  Very well – Wright’s season stat line went as follows: 10-6, 2.24 ERA, 129 strikeouts, and 144 innings in 20 games (all starts).  More digging revealed that he had enjoyed both a lengthy winning streak and a lengthy losing streak this season, so I found some box scores on the Frontier League web site and plotted out his game-by-game numbers.

I went over the numbers three times and arrived at the same result each time: Wright allowed 143 hits, 52 runs, and 41 earned runs in 2009.  His ERA was 2.56.  The problem is that those numbers differ from the ones on his “official” stat line: 140 hits, 50 runs, 41 earned, and a 2.24 ERA.  This discrepancy, which I can’t seem to figure out, significantly tightened the Pitcher of the Year race.  Wright’s closest competition, Ross Stout, was 13-5, 2.94, 138 strikeouts in 143 innings (assuming his dailies are more on the level than Wright’s).  10-6/2.24/129 seemed more impressive than 13-5/2.94/138; the ERA was what really did it for me.  The stat adjustment gave Wright a .32 increase in his ERA, which made me question just how significant the new gap was.

Got all that?

In the end I decided to keep Wright in the top spot, even though his numbers didn’t add up and he lost five decisions in a row to close out the season.  Fact is, he was 10-1 with a 1.74 ERA on August 5 and while he didn’t light the world on fire over the last month, he was good enough at times that his team could have put another victory or two on his resume.  That’s enough to keep him just ahead of the field, in my book.

Honorable Mention
Brian Barr, Texarkana Gunslingers (Continental Baseball League): 9-3, 2.54 ERA, 80 strikeouts, 88.2 innings
Jim Magrane, Somerset Patriots (Atlantic League): 15-4, 2.70 ERA, 134 strikeouts, 183 innings
Dan Reichert, Bridgeport Bluefish (Atlantic League): 14-9, 3.53 ERA, 126 strikeouts, 193 innings, 7 complete games, 3 shutouts, 21 hit batsmen, 10 wild pitches
Ross Stout, Windy City Thunderbolts (Frontier League): 13-5, 2.94 ERA, 138 strikeouts, 143 innings

Independent Reliever of the Year
Rusty Tucker, New Jersey Jackals (Canadian-American Association)

rusty tuckerTucker was the Can-Am League’s Reliever of the Year after a season in which he went 5-2 with a 2.40 ERA, 24 saves, and 56 strikeouts in 41.2 innings.  He was also named the league’s Pitcher of the Week twice.

2009 was Tucker’s third consecutive season with the Jackals, the first in which he didn’t spend some time with an affiliated organization.  This year was almost a disappointment compared to the previous two:

2007: 0-1, 1.48 ERA, 14 saves, 37 strikeouts, 24.1 innings
2008: 3-3, 1.85 ERA, 21 saves, 54 strikeouts, 47.1 innings

That’s 59 saves, 113.1 innings, and 147 strikeouts.  And he’s only still only 29, which means he could still be coming to an organization near you.  Not too shabby.

Honorable Mention
Hunter Davis, Pensacola Pelicans (American Association): 3-1, 1.79 ERA, 22 saves, 40 strikeouts, 40.1 innings
Justin Dowdy, Wichita Wingnuts (American Association): 0-4, 2.25 ERA, 17 saves, 52 strikeouts, 44 innings
Bret Prinz, Somerset Patriots (Atlantic League): 1-2, 2.04 ERA, 21 saves, 51 strikeouts, 39.2 innings
Kris Regas, Sioux Falls Canaries (American Association)
: 2-0, 1.19 ERA, 15 saves, 25 strikeouts, 22.2 innings

The Greatest Pitching Performance in History

What do you think it would be? I mean, Roger Clemens struck out 20 twice. Kerry Wood struck out 20 and nearly added a no-hitter to the equation. While these performances are admittedly great, there’s someone this decade who blew them out of the water.

Someone went and struck out 25 batters.

Photos of this event are admittedly sketchy, because this happened during a Frontier League baseball game. On June 5th, 2000, a pitcher named Brett Gray went positively nuts upon the bats of the Chillicothe Paints. A complete game three hitter. With 25 strikeouts. (And he struck out 4 in an inning. Twice.)

That was his debut for the London Werewolves in 2000. It got him a contract with the Reds two days later. His career with the Reds, for someone who never actually reached Triple-A? It was pretty good. He ended his run in the Reds organization with a 2.91 ERA working mostly as a reliever.

He ended his in game career in Schaumburg working double duty as a player coach. In 2005 he had his last professional in game action at Alexian Field. But his career did not end there.

Despite pitching with a shoulder injury? Gray helped lead the Canadian National team to the Olympics in 2008. I’ll leave Mop-up sports with the quote. (Left in Canadian English.)

“To go out there and throw four (innings) meant the world to me,” said Gray. “I’m a little banged up with my arm so my (pitches) weren’t all that good, but the defence played awesome and it just felt good to get out there and get another win.”

And that is why at BLB salute Brett Gray. Tough enough to pitch for national pride. Skilled enough to strike out 25 in a single game and get an ERA under 3 in the minors. He’s one of the unsung pitchers of the decade.

And before I forget? Yes, I know the story of Ron Neccai. He did strike out 27 batters in a game. That being said? How many people get the win, 25 strikeouts, and their best man all in one night? I didn’t think so.

Get Your Bus Leagues Eat On

Man v. Food samples the Homewrecker Dog (photo courtesy of Travel Channel)

Man v. Food samples the Homewrecker Dog (photo courtesy of Travel Channel)

The Travel Channel show Man v. Food is touring minor league parks tonight at 10pm ET. I talked to some of the people who make the food that host Adam Richman will sample tonight for an ESPN article, but the quotes I selected aren’t going to make it into the finished product, so I’m going to share them here.

The show visited the Yankees A affiliate the Charleston RiverDogs (home of the ambidextrous pitcher and owned by Bill Murray, Michael Veeck, and former AL President Gene Budig), the independent Gateway Grizzlies, and the West Michigan Whitecaps (Detroit A). The show looks fun, so check it out.

Follow in Man v. Food’s Footsteps

Gateway Grizzlies
GCS Ballpark (2002) – 6,000
2301 Grizzlie Bear Blvd. Sauget, IL 62206
Frontier League, Independent

Signature Food: Baseball’s Best Burger. A standard bacon cheeseburger with a twist: the bun is a Krispy Kreme donut cut in half. Condiments are discouraged.

“The hardest part is convincing someone to try it,” says Grizzlies Events Coordinator Jeff O’Neill. “A lot of people will look at the idea and think it sounds disgusting. It is truly amazing to see the reaction once they try it. The combinations of the sweet bun, the saltiness of the bacon and burger and the bitterness of the cheese melt all together for a little taste of heaven.” 

West Michigan Whitecaps
Fifth Third Ballpark (1994). Capacity 10,071.
4500 West River Dr. Comstock Park, MI
Midwest League, Detroit Tigers Class A
Whitecaps in the Majors: Brandon Inge, Joel Zumaya, Cameron Maybin

Signature Food: The Fifth Third Burger. Five beef patties, topped with chili, nacho cheese, American cheese, salsa, sour cream, chips, and lettuce. One a one lb. bun.

Josh Kowalczyk is the Whitecaps promotions intern in charge of the massive burger. According to his meticulous records, nearly 2,000 Fifth Third burgers have been sold this season. 476 intrepid souls have attempted to eat it over the course of nine innings, and an amazing 298 of those succeeded in eating the whole… thing.

Kowalczyk remembers the scene when Adam Richman and the Man v. Food crew came out to the ballgame. “A lot of people found out he was coming, and it was absolutely crazy,” he recalled. “Our attendance that night was 7,921, but more people watched him than the ballgame. He talked to people everywhere in the stadium.”

Charleston RiverDogs
Joseph P. Riley, Jr. Park AKA “The Joe” (1997). Capacity 6,000.
360 Fishburne St. Charleston, SC
South Atlantic League, New York Yankees, Class A
Famous owners: Mike Veeck, former AL President Gene Budig, and comedian Bill Murray.
RiverDogs in the Majors: B.J. Upton, Rocco Baldelli, Delmon Young, Orioles Manager Dave Tremblay.

Signature Food: The Homewrecker Dog. A ½ pound frank is the palette. 25 potential toppings are your colors. The standard condiments are all here, but a true connoisseur will experiment with the likes of sweet-potato mustard, fried okra, and cole slaw.

“Mike Veeck firmly believes in the motto ‘Fun is Good’,” says team representative Andy Solomon. “Which means entertaining the fan from the time he purchases a ticket to the time he leaves the parking lot. Bill Murray sometimes attends games as an ordinary fan in the left field bleachers, with his hat pulled down over his eyes. Other times, he comes out on the field and takes part in the Sumo wrestling. You never know.”

A lack of predictable fare is part of the RiverDogs mystique. Just peruse the concessions board (), which features unique items like the Elvis (peanut butter and bacon), the Tijuana Tornado (a true “hot” dog), and Ye Olde turkey leg in addition to the Homewrecker.

This Week in Bobbleheads – Week 23

Just got back from the Lannan bobblehead giveaway with a great story to share.   The Kinston Indians have a Taiwanese pitcher named Chen-Cheng Lee whom I’ve never seen pitch despite having seen the K-Tribe 3 times this season (Twice for bobblehead giveaways).   Joking with the pitching coach, I said hey how about putting Lee in this time since I never saw him throw the first 2 times.   He said ok and basically I thought he was just kidding.   Sure enough in the 8th, K-Tribe manager Chris Tremie signaled for Lee to get ready and he pitched the bottom half.   Happy as a lark, I snapped photos of Lee and watched him have 2Ks even though he gave up a meaningless HR in a Kinston win over Potomac.   Great times in the life of this Taiwanese player aficionado. Here’s the week ahead:

Memphis Redbirds 9/7/09 Colby Rasmus – First 1,500 – Great way to cap off the Redbirds season by giving one of its budding future Cardinal studs.

Reno Aces 9/7/09 Aceball – First 3,000 – The fan vote bobblehead in Reno features the mascot who appears when homers are hit.

Lowell Spinners 9/8/09 Extreme Blue The Frisbee Dog (Mascot) – First 1,500 – The regular season didn’t have any days left from this earlier rainout for this promo so they saved it for their playoff run.

Pittsburgh Pirates 9/8/09 Arnold Palmer – The Pirates celebrate the 80th birthday of this Latrobe, PA golf legend.

West Michigan Whitecaps 9/10/09 Jeremy Bonderman – First 1,000 – The Whitecaps have made a habit of playoff bobblehead giveaways, and this one features Bondo in a special jersey.

Arizona Diamondbacks 9/12/09 Augie Ojeda – First 25,000 – When the D-Backs traded Tony Pena to the White Sox, all hell broke loose in the Arizona bobbleworld. Ojeda was moved up to this day, which was originally scheduled to be Tony and Ojeda’s runner up was added as a final giveaway later on this month…Stay tuned.

Houston Astros 9/12/09 Jose Valverde – First 10,000 – Another animated closer bobblehead showing his tarzan-like antics upon celebrating a save.

Minnesota Twins 9/12/09 Jim Kaat Bronze Statuette – First 10,000 – Kitty still isn’t bronzed in Cooperstown but that hasn’t stopped the Twins from doing it at the Dome.

Detroit Tigers 9/13/09 Paws (Mascot) – All Kids 14 and under – This marks the first time the lovable tiger mascot is available as a giveaway at an MLB venue.

Florida Marlins 9/13/09 Hanley Ramirez – First 10,000 – When it comes to giving current Marlins out as figures, nobody comes to mind more than Han-Ram.

I’d also like to thank Southern Maryland BlueCrabs GM Chris Allen for the great hospitality Saturday night along with the Brooks Robinson and Roofman past giveaways. Good luck in the playoffs pal.