Archive for the ‘Golden League’ Category

Bret Boone begins Indie coaching career.

The Seattle Times is reporting that former Mariners star Bret Boone is taking a managerial job with the Victoria Seals of the Golden League. The team is located in British Columbia, so the 40-year-old Boone may be in a perfect position to draw fans in the Pacific NW to indie baseball this summer.

“This is a fantastic opportunity for me to start the second chapter of my baseball career,” said Boone, 40. “Returning to the Pacific Northwest is a thrill for me.”

Boone’s position with the Seals marks his first foray into professional baseball management.

The Seals open their season May 21. The Golden Baseball League is an independent league featuring nine teams, from Calgary to Tucson.

[Seattle Times]

Is it just me, or is Boone looking a bit Cal Ripkenesque in this particular photo?

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Bus Leagues Q&A: Tiffany Brooks of the Arizona Winter League

A few days ago, I reported a tidbit of news about Japanese baseball star Eri Yoshida, who will be joining the Yuma Scorpions for the Arizona Winter League season. Turns out she’s not going to be the only woman joining the pros in the Golden League this winter. Former Gonzaga softball player Tiffany Brooks let me know that she’ll be there as well. I was pleased when she agreed to be interviewed for Bus Leagues, and I hope those of you who get a chance will head out to see some Arizona Winter League action and cheer Tiffany and her teammates on.

Here’s our conversation, which was conducted via coast-to-coast email as I was digging out from the east coast’s Snowpocalypse ’09. We talked about why she wants to play baseball instead of softball, what she hopes to accomplish in her first crack at professional baseball in the U.S., and how young girls can realize their athletic dreams.

Bus Leagues: How did you connect with the Arizona Winter League? 

Tiffany Brooks: I was looking for tryout opportunities for pro baseball, and because there is an ancient (1952) and silly ban on women in the MLB, that meant I needed to focus solely on Independent Professional Baseball for now and originally started exploring the Continental League because of its expansion. I explored a few options, and was excited to get a call from the Joliet Jackhammers (Northern League), but there was no follow-up, so I started exploring other options where I could showcase and see what might happen. The Arizona Winter League (Golden Baseball League) is the best-established and best-attended by scouts, so I contacted Stephen Bedford and asked if women were welcome. He contacted the Commissioner, Kevin Outcalt, and although they both said it had never been done before, I got back an immediate and warm invitation. The Commissioner, by the way, has been amazing and supportive of my participation in the AWL.

What are your goals for the winter session?

Well, as you might imagine, like any ballplayer, my dream is to win a contract with someone. I’d love to play in the GBL because I live in the West, but would be happy to go literally anywhere to play. I’ve played in Holland in the amateur portion of the Dutch League and speak Spanish and a little Japanese, so who knows?

Beyond my personal goal to win a professional contract and fulfill a lifelong dream of playing pro ball, I do have some other large-scale goals. I’d say number one would be to play well, help my team and play the game the way it is meant to be played – to show that women who have a talent and love for the game and are willing to live, eat, sleep, and sweat baseball, if given the proper training and opportunities, CAN play baseball with the men at the professional level. In this way, I sincerely hope to help pave the way for women’s participation in pro baseball here in America, and throughout the world.

Lastly, I hope to hone my own skills through professional-level instruction, and through the process of raising the level of my game, learn instructional techniques I can bring back and share with women and girls who want to play baseball!

Do you meet many other women who want to play baseball instead of softball?

World-wide, baseball is much more popular with women than softball is, so yes, in my travels playing ball, I meet women who want to play baseball all the time! Here in the US, I’m meeting an increasing number who suddenly realize that playing Baseball is an option – that they don’t have to play softball unless they want to. They’re both great games, and I did play abroad on pro contracts in softball before realizing that my lifelong dreams of playing pro baseball might have a chance to come true!

In the US and Canada there are many, many women playing baseball right now – some in women’s-only tournaments, some playing in men’s amateur leagues, and some in both – who have realized their dream to keep playing baseball. Now it’s time for the next step – to integrate women into professional baseball, and give them the pathways to develop the skills necessary to get there.

You plan to room with Eri Yoshida in the AWL. Have you spoken to her yet, or will you meet for the first time when you get to Yuma?

I heard the initial plan is for us to room together. I haven’t spoken with Eri, so we’ll meet for the first time there. We should make for some interesting photo opps, as she’s 5′ and I’m a 6 footer with quite a lot of muscle. Eri is quite well known in Japan and has created quite a media buzz, so I’m not sure if rooming together is a done deal or whether we both may need some space for media and quiet time. Regardless, I look forward to meeting her, working together to help promote women’s baseball, and hopefully for some great cultural exchanges.

Why do you think softball became the more common sport for women to play?

That’s a complicated question, and not without some political implications.

Softball was originally invented to be played indoors for factory workers (mostly all men) to have something to do during the winter months in places like Chicago. Many were baseball players at various levels in good weather and wanted to keep playing something with a stick and a ball when it was too cold or snowy outside. In those days, the ball actually was “soft,” so that shorter distances could be used indoors without damaging walls, factory equipment, and yes, players. Nowdays the ball of course is anything but soft…equally as hard (if not more so) than a baseball.

How did it become a “women’s” sport (don’t tell that to the US Men’s National Fastpitch team, by the way!)? According to the synopsis of Jennifer Ring’s book Stolen Bases: Why American Girls Don’t Play Baseball, “In the early twentieth century, Albert Goodwill Spalding–sporting goods magnate, baseball player, and promoter–declared baseball off limits for women and envisioned global baseball on a colonialist scale, using the American sport to teach men from non-white races and non-European cultures to become civilized and rational. And by the late twentieth century, baseball had become serious business for boys and men at all levels, with female players perceived as obstacles or detriments to rising male players’ chances of success.” If this is truly the case (along with Commissioner Ford Frick‘s ban of women in professional baseball in 1952), then it becomes fairly clear that pathways to pro baseball were no longer open, and many women who loved to play baseball got channeled into the “other” sport with a stick and a ball. Since then, of course, women have taken softball to the Olympics and into their own pro league, competing as highly-skilled athletes.

I think the harder answer to this question is that although all women CAN play baseball, just like men, not all of us have the genetic, physical attributes to play at the pro level, and given the lack of opportunities for women to advance their baseball playing abilities (it’s still a huge fight to play baseball in High School, College, or American Legion/Travel Ball), it’s rare to find a woman with not only a passion for the game, but the physical attributes and training necessary to play alongside men in professional ball. Hopefully that will change soon, as opportunities expand and girls and women are once again given the chance to dream about playing in the Big Leagues.

How did you first fall in love with baseball?

That’s almost like asking a fish how it first came to swim! I fell in love with baseball from the first moment I laid hands on a ball and glove. I started playing at age 4 in tee-ball and have played baseball or softball ever since. I was forced out of baseball at age 15, but returned to it after a career in Softball. There is something magical about every single time you step on the field. I think it’s a form of religion, a type of religious ritual. Those stadiums we get to play in sometimes are Cathedrals. They are our Notre Dames. High School fields are chapels…but sacred nonetheless. They are like holy places to me – and to most other ballplayers I’ve talked with…well, they feel the same.

Was it easy to find a game when you were a kid?

I grew up dirt poor, so I played wherever and whenever I could. We always found a way to play – pick-up games, in the street, whatever. I grew up rurally, so when there was no one around, stop signs and trees became catchers, tree limbs became bats, and there wasn’t a rock or dirt clod in sight that was safe. I would also sit for hours at a time and throw a tennis ball at a concrete wall.

As for playing on boys’ teams, I was very well accepted until about age 13. Then although I was still bigger than a lot of the boys, things started to change. My teammates respected my playing from age 13-15 when I played, pitched and hit well, but other teams began to put the pressure on my own teammates. Eventually, the pressure built and I was forced into Softball. Nevertheless, I was an all-star from age 8-15 at 1B and as a reliever.

You played in college. Are you worried that the current financial crunch in higher education might kill off some opportunities for women to play softball/baseball?

Great question. Yeah, the current financial situation is tough on schools, especially with sports programs. I think it could be a two-edged sword. On the one hand, the NCAA has recently ruled that baseball and softball are NOT equivalent sports, so no longer can women be funneled into Softball if they want to play Baseball. The ruling and the reality are two different matters of course, but it’s a big step in the right direction.

So, if a school were to eliminate softball, then the girls could possibly swell the ranks of baseball. On the other hand, if baseball and softball are both eliminated due to financial problems, then of course, ALL ballplayers are hurt. One side effect I’ve seen is that travel ball seems to be growing as the school programs are suffering financially. This may be good for girls who want to play baseball, but it’s too early for me to tell what will happen. I hope for the positive for all – for girls who want to play Softball to keep having the opportunity, and for girls who want to play Baseball, for them to have an open door to prove themselves and keep playing the game they love.

You’ve traveled quite a bit as a player. Where are some of the most exciting places you’ve gone around the world?

I’ve had the tremendous opportunity to play in many places, and that’s been made possible by all my coaches who gave of themselves selflessly over the years, by my present sponsors, Akadema, The 90 MPH Club, 3n2Sports, Gold’s Gym, Birch Bats, and Dr. Pirie at the Spokane Eye Clinic. I couldn’t do it without their support and the support of all my friends and family who have been patrons, patronesses, and just plain great.

I’d say I’ve loved to play everywhere I’ve had the opportunity. For baseball, playing in Hong Kong, China has probably been the most exciting…playing with women from all over the world and competing for the gold twice there has been one of the greatest experiences of my life. Playing baseball in Holland, a the only female ballplayer in the league was amazing… my coach there, Quansio Quant, my catcher, and all the guys were tremendously supportive.

In softball, I’d say playing in Australia and the Czech Republic…both were pretty exotic places to get to play, and although the Aussies might not think it’s exotic, watching a dozen wallabies hop off the practice field and being run off the field by an Aussie Brown (deadly) snake seem pretty exotic to me!

Do you have a signature pitch you hope to impress with this winter, or do you expect to see more time in the field?

I’d say we’ll have to wait and see. This will be a good test for me. I’ve played at the amateur level with guys about as far as I can go, and with women, about the same at international competition.

I have six pitches I throw, and I’m hoping at least a couple will give the guys some trouble. I’ve been hitting well at the amateur levels (wood bat), but again, this is quite a leap in level. I’m pretty sure I can compete defensively with my glove at 1B, but we’ll have to see where my strengths lie. The main thing is whether it is with my arm as a relief pitcher or with my glove and bat, I want to help my team and do honor to the game by playing it the best I possibly can.

What would you say to young girls out there who love baseball but have limited opportunities to participate on a team level?

I’d say do not give up! If this is the game you want to play, don’t take “no” for an answer. You’ll need to have thick skin on some of the teams, even at the teenage and adult levels. Shake off the negativity like a duck shakes off water. Practice your game. Train. Get strong… get just as strong as the guys. Don’t be worried about image…if you love the game, do whatever it takes to be successful. Practice at least 6 days a week, and think about the game every day. Believe in yourself and be the best player on the field. Play Hard and Dream Big!

This Week in Bobbleheads – Week 6

What a week this has been!  Alex Rodriguez has a dramatic return from his injury with a first pitch homer on 5/8/09 and Manny Ramirez shows his feminine side by being the latest superstar to test positive for PEDs.  Still though, bobblehead promos are front and center on my end of this blog.  Here’s the lineup this week:

San Francisco Giants 5/12/09 Lou Seal (Chinese) (Mascot) – Part of a Chinese Heritage Night Promotion.  Although a Seal as a Lion Dancer is quite intriguing.

Chicago Cubs 5/12/09 Ernie Banks – First 10,000 – Cubbies go retro with his second giveaway.

Memphis Redbirds 5/12/09 Keith McDonald – First 1,000 – Another in the Redbirds alumni series.

Trenton Thunder 5/13/09 Joba Chamberlain First 2,000 6 and over – Last year they gave out a Joba for plan holders only. This time a straight giveaway.

Myrtle Beach Pelicans 5/15/09 Chris “Butter” Ball – First 1,000 – It’s time for the Pelicans to honor their groundskeeper following in the footstep of Trenton and Clearwater. He also boasts the title of 3-time consecutive winner of the Carolina League field of the Year!

Lansing Lugnuts 5/16/09 Carlos Zambrano – Lansing chooses to honor a no-hitter by a Cubs alumnus even though they are a Jays farm team.

Pittsburgh Pirates 5/16/09 Nate McLouth – Pirates annual All-Star bobblehead.

Tampa Bay Rays 5/16/09 Evan Longoria Figurine – This is probably the only way you can get this hot hitter to stand still, other than an upcoming bobblehead of course!!!

Texas Rangers 5/16/09 Josh Hamilton – The Rangers honor the defending HR derby champion.

San Francisco Giants 5/17/09 Tim Lincecum – First 20,000 – The Giants give the reigning NL Cy Young champ his due.

St. Louis Cardinals 5/17/09 Lou Brock Statue – First 25,000 16 and older – Continue your collection in the Cardinals bronze statue series with this one-of-a-kind replica of the Hall of Famer, just like the one that stands on the corner of 8th and Clark.

Toronto Blue Jays 5/17/09 Alex Rios – First 10,000 – This bobblehead is one of the first I’ve ever seen with a weight around the bat.

This week’s bobblehead travels take me to Trenton for the Joba bobblehead night on Wednesday. Don’t be chicken, Don’t be shy, come around and just say hi.

I Was Once Traded For Six Geometry Textbooks*

Sometimes, the stories write themselves (other times, they’re written by the AP):

The Calgary Vipers of the Golden Baseball League couldn’t get newly signed pitcher John Odom into Canada for immigration reasons. And the Laredo Broncos of the United League were willing to take a cheap gamble on a pitcher.

Oh, and the Vipers really, really wanted some new bats.

And so Odom, about a month after being acquired by a Canadian team, found himself Tuesday on the roster of a team on the Mexican border. All for the price of 10 Prairie Sticks Maple Bats, double-dipped black 34-inch C243 style.

According to the story, the bats for which Odom was traded are valued at about $65.50 in the quanity provided.  His services are worth about $655.

*Not true, but the thought of my boss calling me into her office and breaking the news to me makes me chuckle.

Indy Spotlight – The Ballparks

Minor league ballparks have always been a source of fascination for me.  One of the most interesting things about working for the Nashua Pride (how many more mentions can I make of that job before the hate mail starts rolling in?) was “Historic” Holman Stadium, a city-owned ballpark that played host to a number of amateur activities (including, for many years, high school football) as well as the various professional baseball teams that rolled through the area over the years. 

Holman Stadium was, by far, the oldest ballpark in the Atlantic League; I’m fairly certain that the league’s six other venues were all built in 1998 or later.  But one thing that I always liked about Holman, and this may just be the home team bias talking, was the history that had taken place there.  It was the place where Roy Campanella and Don Newcombe had played in 1946, to become the first black ballplayers to see action for a professional team based in the United States.  Sure, the layout is terrible – the field of play isn’t visible from the main concourse, for example, so on a busy night, you could go for a hot dog and miss three innings – but there was, and still is, a certain charm to the place. 

But don’t take my word for it.  I still get all misty when I visit Fenway Park.

There are 62 independent teams in action this season, 61 of which have home stadiums.  Wikipedia lists the cost information for 20 stadiums, the year opened for 55 stadiums, and the capacity for 60 stadiums.  Using that, I put together a few lists – oldest and youngest ballparks, biggest ballparks, most expensive, yadda yadda yadda.  It’s interesting stuff, but take it with a grain of salt.  For one, the information is from Wikipedia, and two, the listed capacities aren’t always accurate.  For instance, Lancaster’s Clipper Magazine Stadium is noted as having a capacity of up to 7,500.  On Opening Night, however, they set an Atlantic League record by packing 8,485 fans into the place.  Obviously, there’s a slight difference there, probably due to standing room, but still – grain of salt.

Five Oldest Independent Ballparks
Hanover Insurance Park at Fitton Field (Worcester Tornadoes, Can-Am League) – Opened in 1905
Bosse Field (Evansville Otters, Frontier League) – Opened in 1915
Bringhurst Field (Alexandria Aces, United League) – Opened in 1933
Lawrence-Dumont Stadium (Wichita Wingnuts, American Association) – Opened in 1934
Holman Stadium (Nashua Pride, Can-Am League) – Opened in 1937

Four Newest Independent Ballparks
QuikTrip Park at Grand Prairie (Grand Prairie AirHogs, American Association) – 2008
Regency Furniture Stadium (Southern Maryland Blue Crabs, Atlantic League) – 2008
Sovereign Bank Stadium (York Revolution, Atlantic League) – 2007
Rent One Park (Southern Illinois Miners, Frontier League) – 2007

Five Most Expensive Independent League Ballparks
U.S. Steel Yard (Gary SouthShore RailCats, Northern League) – $45 million
Sovereign Bank Stadium (York Revolution, Atlantic League) – $32.5 million
Bears & Eagles Riverfront Stadium (Newark Bears, Atlantic League) – $30 million
Haymarket Park (Lincoln Saltdogs, American Association) – $29.53 million
Silver Cross Field (Joliet JackHammers, Northern League) – $27 million

Five Largest Independent League Ballparks (in terms of capacity)
Desert Sun Stadium (Yuma Scorpions, Golden Baseball League) – 10,500
Ottawa Stadium (Ottawa Rapids, Can-Am League) – 10,332
Telus Field (Edmonton Cracker-Cats, Golden Baseball League) – 10,000
Cohen Stadium (El Paso Diablos, American Association) – 9,725
Haymarket Park (Lincoln Saltdogs, American Association) – 8,500

Oldest Average Ballpark Age By League
United League Baseball – 41.4 years
Can-Am League – 37.375 years
Golden Baseball League – 30 years
American Association – 26.2 years
Frontier League – 21 years
Northern League – 7.83 years
Atlantic League – 5.875 years
Continental Baseball League – 5.5 years

Largest Average Capacity By League
Northern League – 6,078
American Association – 5,833
Atlantic League – 5,678
Golden Baseball League – 5,367
Can-Am League – 4,866
United League Baseball – 4,840
Frontier League – 4,647
Continental Baseball League – 2,107

Indy Spotlight – Holding the Flavor of the Month’s – Ahem – in the Bus Leagues

When I promised last week to provide a relatively accurate list of former major leaguers that are currently listed on independent rosters, I had no idea what a task it would become.  Did you guys know there are like eight independent leagues out there?  Eighty or so teams?  Somewhere in the vicinity of 1,600 players?  That’s a lot of players.  Throw in a vicious flu/bronchitis that hit on Monday morning and it’s a miracle we’re here today, only one day behind schedule.

The list below isn’t perfect.  There have been some signings since I copied all the rosters into Word, the most obvious of which I accounted for, but I didn’t go through and enter every name into BR to see if somebody had four games of experience in 1999. 

Not surprisingly, the Atlantic League dominates this list, with 56 former big leaguers under contract thus far.  The ALPB has been one of the top independent leagues in the country for ten years now, the place where high-level talent goes when they have something to prove.  In 2001, Jose Canseco started the year with the Newark Bears (including a record crowd of over 4,800 on Opening Day in Nashua) before finishing the year (and his major league career) with the Chicago White Sox.  Two years later, Rickey Henderson took the same route, playing for Newark (literally an hour into my first day as an intern with the Pride, I tagged along with another intern who had been assigned to meet Henderson at his car) before the Dodgers came calling for the last thirty games.  And my personal favorite?  Dante Bichette, who joined the Pride in late July of 2004 after skipping two full seasons, took about a week to shake the rust off, then put on a clinic over the final month.

Will any of the guys on this list follow in the footsteps of Canseco, Henderson, Brendan Donnelly, or any of the other guys who used the independent leagues to get one more shot at the big time?  Too early to tell, but we’ll try to keep an eye on it as the season progresses.  (Some of the more interesting names are in bolded italics.  Guys that I’m not 100% certain about are listed as “possible”.)

American Association (A – AA)

Lincoln Saltdogs
Felix Jose (OF) – 1988-95, 2000, 2002-03 – Jose was the Atlantic League’s Co-MVP with the Nashua Pride in 1998.

Pensacola Pelicans
John Webb (P) – 2004-05

Sioux City Explorers
Dusty Bergman (P) – 2004

Sioux Falls Canaries
Pat Mahomes (P) – 1992-97, 1999-03

Wichita Wingnuts
Kevin Hooper (IF) – 2005-06
Dustan Mohr (OF) – 2001-07

Atlantic League of Professional Baseball (AA – AAA)

Bridgeport Bluefish
Adam Greenberg (IF) – 2005 – Greenberg had one of the craziest careers ever, taking a pitch off the head during his first major league at-bat.  He left the game and has not appeared in a big league uniform since.
Alex Prieto (IF) – 2003-04
Tim Drew (P) – 2000-04 – The middle of the three baseball-playing Drew brothers, Tim and J.D. played together on the 2004 Atlanta Braves.
T.J. Tucker (P) – 2000, 2002-05
Eric Dubose (P) – 2002-06
Matt Ford (P) – 2003

Camden Riversharks
Kevin Walker (LHP) – 2000-05
Jason Phillips (1B/C) – 1999, 2002-03
Josh Rabe (OF) – 2006-07
Mike Vento (OF) – 2005-06

Lancaster Barnstormers
Matt LeCroy (C-1B) – 2000-07
John Nelson (SS) – 2006
Sendy Rleal (P) – 2006

Long Island Ducks
Tom Martin (P) – 1997-07
Jason Simontacchi (P) – 2002-04, 2007
Joe Valentine (P) – 2003-05
Brent Abernathy (IF) – 2001-03, 2005
Donaldo Mendez (IF) – 2001, 2003
Pete Rose, Jr. (IF) – 1997
Carl Everett (OF) – 1993-2006
Damian Rolls (OF) – 2000-04
Jamal Strong (OF) – 2003, 2005

Newark Bears
Bobby Hill (IF) – 2002-05
Ramon Castro (IF) – 2004
Randall Simon (IF) – 1997-99, 2001-06
Cory Aldridge (OF) – 2001
Keith Reed (OF) – 2005
Ruben Mateo (OF) – 1999-2004
Jose Herrera (OF) – 1995-96
Al Levine (P) – 1996-2005
Benito Baez (P) – 2001
Edwin Almonte (P) – 2003
J.J. Trujillo (P) – 2002
Will Cunnane (P) – 1997-2004

Somerset Patriots
Michael Ryan (OF) – 2000-05
Jeff Duncan (OF) – 2003-04
Brandon Knight (P) – 2001-02
Scott Wiggins (P) – 2002
Bret Prinz (P) – 2001-05, 2007
Andy Van Hekken (P) – 2002
Brian Reith (P) – 2001, 2003-04

Southern Maryland Blue Crabs
Jeff Farnsworth (P) – 2002
John Halama (P) – 1998-2006
Adam Johnson (P) – possible – 2001, 2003
Jason Pearson (P) – 2002-03
Carlos Perez (P) – possible – 1995, 1997-2000
Dan Reichert (P) – 1999-2003
Damian Jackson (IF) – possible – 1996-2006
Greg Blosser (OF) – 1993-94 – Anyone else surprised that Blosser only played 22 games in the majors?
Eric Crozier (OF) – 2004

York Revolution
Wayne Franklin (P) – 2000-06
Pete Munro (P) – 1999-2000, 2002-04
Aaron Myette (P) – 1999-2004
Aaron Rakers (P) – 2004-05, 2007
Corey Thurman (P) – 2002-03
Dave Veres (P) – 1994-2003

Canadian-American Association of Professional Baseball (A)

New Jersey Jackals
Joel Bennett (P) – 1998-99
Luke Allen (OF) – 2002-03

Ottawa Rapids
Napoleon Calzado (OF) – 2005

Sussex Skyhawks
Yohanny Valera (C ) – 2000
Walter Young (1B) – 2005

Golden Baseball League (AA)

Edmonton Cracker-Cats
Augustine Montero (P) – possible – 2006
Hector Ramirez (P) – possible – 1999-2000

Yuma Scorpions
Pascual Matos (C ) – 1999

Northern League (A-AA)

Gary SouthShore RailCats
Tony Cogan (P) – 2001

Joliet JackHammers
David Moraga (P) – 2000
Juan Carlos Diaz (INF) – 2002

Schaumburg Flyers
James Lofton (INF) – 2001 – I have an absolutely awesome story that features Lofton as the central figure.  I’ve been meaning to write it up for about two years now – maybe this blog will give me the momentum to do so.
Rontrez Johnson (OF) – 2003
Jermaine Allensworth (OF) – 1996-99
Bo Hart (INF) – 2003-04

United League Baseball

Laredo Broncos
Edgard Clemente (OF) – 1998-2000

San Angelo Colts
Matt Duff (P) – possible – 2002

Independent League Opening Dates

Opening dates for the eight independent leagues currently scheduled to operate in 2008:

Atlantic League – April 25

American Association – May 7 (Sioux City @ Wichita only); full schedule begins May 8

United League Baseball – May 13

Northern League – May 15

Frontier League – May 18 (Washington @ Chillicothe only); full schedule begins May 21

Canadian-American League – May 22

Golden Baseball League – May 22

Continental Baseball League – May 23