Posts Tagged ‘Memphis Redbirds’

It’s A Beautiful Day, Isotopes Fans – Let’s Turn Three

The front page of MiLB.com has a note that Albuquerque turned a triple play in Game One of its playoff series yesterday against Memphis.  I wanted to see how it happened, so I went to the game recap and found this description:

  • Brian Barden walks.
  • Mark Shorey singles on a line drive to third baseman Blake DeWitt. Brian Barden to 2nd.
  • Matt Pagnozzi grounds into a triple play, shortstop Chin-lung Hu to first baseman Hector Luna to shortstop Chin-lung Hu. Brian Barden out at 3rd. Mark Shorey out at 2nd.

Call me crazy, but I found it impossible to make any sense out of that.  Good thing there was link to a game story:

Memphis added another run in the fifth and looked poised for more in the sixth until some defensive wizardry by Chin-Lung Hu got the ‘Topes out of a jam. With Brian Barden on second and Mark Shorey on first, Pagnozzi sent a grounder to short, allowing Hu to tag Barden, who was moving on contact off second, for the first out before stepping on the bag to force out Shorey and completing the third triple play in Isotopes history with the turn to Hector Luna at first.

Okay, that makes more sense.  The recap didn’t make it clear that Hu handled the first two outs on his own before throwing to first for the rare (I imagine) 6-3 triple play.  Too bad second baseman Tony Abreu wasn’t involved – Hu-to-Abreu-to-Luna has a nice ring to it.

Advertisements

Back-to-Back-to-Back-to-Back

August has featured a number of exceptional pitching performances, so it was nice to look through some box scores tonight and see something impressive on the offensive side of things for a change.

Heading into the top of the eighth inning against the Round Rock Express, the Memphis Redbirds held an 8-6 advantage.  With the 2-3-4 hitters coming up, the Express brought in newly acquired Armando Benitez to make his 2009 affiliated debut.

The first two batters, Tyler Greene and Nick Stavinoha, were retired harmlessly.  Then, as often happens when Benitez is on the hill, all hell broke loose.

Troy Glaus hit his second homerun of the year to left…Allen Craig hit his 23rd homerun of the year, also to left…Mark Hamilton hit his sixth homerun of the year, once again, to left…and Daniel Descalso hit his second homerun of the year, mixing it up by taking it over the wall in right-center field.  Every infielder except the shortstop (Greene) went deep in the inning.  Both corner outfielders also hit homeruns in the game: right fielder Stavinoha in the first and left fielder Craig in the eighth.

Four consecutive homeruns by one team has been accomplished six times at the major league level (in two different clusters: 1961-64 and 2006-08), most recently by the Chicago White Sox on August 14, 2008.

Wacky Doings in the Rasmus Family

If you read the Z-meter, you’ve probably noticed that St. Louis prospect Colby Rasmus is one of the few triple-A denizens of the meter not to have a red-hot stat line yet this season. Despite being a guest of the parent club during spring training, Rasmus has struggled since being sent back to the Memphis Redbirds for a few more reps.

Why? Hard to say. But reader Bruce, a Redbirds fan, sent us an article that attempts to get at the truth. Colby himself is hinting that it may be partly psychological. Like any of us, he didn’t react well when something he wanted was within his grasp, only to be taken away.

“In spring training I felt good. When I got sent down, I was a little upset about it. It put me in a weird place, I guess,” Rasmus said. “When the season started I was trying some different things and worked myself into a funk. I’m trying to get back where I was going into spring training. I felt like I was plenty good enough in Florida. I felt like I was good enough to be with the big-league team.”

[St. Louis Post-Dispatch]

Colby’s father, Tony (a high school baseball coach), blames Tony LaRussa’s micro-managing of the phenom’s swing. He even hints that his son should have defied the eccentric manager, saying “I don’t care if God tells me to change what I’m doing. If I’ve been having success, I’m not going to do it.”

That fairly mild public criticism was upstaged by a message-board posting under the elder Rasmus’ screen name that suggested Colby shouldn’t trust the Cards’ manager at all, stating “Heck, I wouldn’t”.

Tony Rasmus said Friday that one of Colby’s younger brothers posted the criticism under a borrowed screen name. The elder Rasmus said he is “humiliated” by the resulting firestorm and is too embarrassed to speak to Mozeliak or Jeff Luhnow, vice president of scouting and player development.

Hard to say what really happened. One thing’s for sure, family meddling can’t help in a case like this. At best, it gives the prospect an excuse, an outside force that is limiting his development. Hopefully, Colby won’t use that excuse to quit working to solve his own problems.

We here at Bus Leagues love to see success stories, so here’s hoping Colby Rasmus earns that red stat line soon, and gets his callup to St. Louis.

[colby-rasmus.com]